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Haiti earthquake

What Should it Mean to be Haitian in 2014

by Pascal Robert

The white colonialists have never forgiven Haitians for the revolution of 1804, the first successful revolt against white supremacy. “The slander and degradation against us about our poverty, alleged political incompetence, and poor educational infrastructure is tied to the persistent desire of our historical enemies to wipe our revolution from our minds and the rest of the world’s.”

The Pain Rush in Haiti

by Ezili Dantò

The crime against Haiti is seen in the poverty of its people, victims of horrific crimes at the hands of the European tribes. “The Haiti struggle is cleared of cognitive dissonance only when you factor in structuralized white supremacist hatred – its genocidal germs, guns and steel.”

Haiti: Capitalist Plunder and Empty Promises

 

by Ama Biney

Disaster capitalism operates in the raw in Haiti, where foreign governments, corporations and non-governmental organizations conspire with a venal local elite to mass poverty and brazen resource theft. “It is highly debatable as to whether the lives of most Haitians have markedly improved, if at all, since these NGOs arrived.”

Seismic Imperialism: Haiti’s Buried Cry for Help on the Third Anniversary of the Earthquake

 

by Jesse Hagopian

Under Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama, Haiti has been deprived of its sovereignty and ability to defend herself from natural disaster and human predators. “The world's most powerful governments and institutions have imposed policies that have compounded the damage done by the earthquake.”

One Year After Quake: Million Plus Remain Homeless and Displaced in Haiti

by Bill Quigley and Jeena Shah

Statistical tricks are being used to minimize Haiti’s gargantuan homeless crisis. An outfit called the International Organization for Migration is claiming false “progress” in resettling earthquake victims based on the fact that thousands have left displacement camps. However, that’s an illusion, since “of an estimated 1,268 displacement camps, at least 29% have been forcibly closed – meaning tens of thousands of people have been evicted.” And “people moving from displacement camps in the city to living in a tent in the countryside have not really moved out of homelessness, they have just moved.”

Nine Months After the Quake – A Million Haitians Slowly Dying

by Bill Quigley

After all the media fanfare about American “generosity” to Haiti – a nation tortured by the U.S. throughout its history – one million people have been left to rot with not a penny of aid from Washington. “Every park, every school yard, every parking lot appear to have people living under sheets or lean-to tents,” writes the author, from Port-au-Prince. But “only 13,000 temporary structures have been built and they are far away from family, school, jobs and healthcare. There is no place to go.”

 

One of the World's Best Kept Secrets: Cuban Medical Aid to Haiti

Cuban doctors in Haitiby Emily J. Kirk and John M. Kirk
Consumers of U.S. corporate media were given the impression that the American invasion/disaster relief action was the primary foreign benefactor to Haiti’s hundreds of thousands of earthquake victims. Not so, not by a long shot. Cuba, Venezuela and the neighboring Dominican Republic were first on the scene with the most help, and have committed to building a comprehensive health care system for Haiti.

Freedom Rider: Pornography of Suffering

congoby BAR editor and senior columnist Margaret Kimberley
The American mentality seems hopelessly rooted in the gutter, keenly attuned to tales of rape and bestiality but supremely indifferent to the elementary facts of life and history. The current genocide in Congo is as little known as that country’s previous holocaust, at the hands of the Belgians, more than a century ago.

Defending Haiti

black is back haiti demoby Charo R. Walker
The entire African diaspora owes Haiti much more than simple gratitude for establishing the model of Black resistance to slavery and dehumanization – it owes Haiti a vigorous defense against its oppressors. “We need to let the Haitian people re-gain control, be owners of their own destiny.”

The U.S. Ain't No “Model”: Defend Haiti in Miami, February 20

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford
Click the flash player to listen to or the mic to download an audio in MP3 format.
Haiti's people don't need occupying armies; they “deserve a massive human response to their material needs, and they deserve solidarity in their struggle to regain national self-determination.” Join the Black is Back Coalition this weekend for a National Mobilization in Defense of Haiti. “A free and independent Haiti can only rise under the democratic direction of Haitians, themselves – not under the guns of U.S. neocolonialism.”

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U.S. Brags Haiti Response is a “Model” While More Than a Million Remain Homeless

Tent city in Haitiby Bill Quigley
U.S. officials are full of themselves, hawking their military expeditionary mission to Haiti as the future of humanitarian crisis response. Meanwhile, Partners in Health director Dr. Louise Ivers reports “’there is more and more misery’ in Port au Prince as fears of typhoid and dysentery haunt the camps as the rainy season looms.”

Under the Pretense of Haiti Disaster Relief, U.S. Running a Military Occupation

haitians fenced inby Arun Gupta
The United States has seized on the Haitian earthquake crisis, not only to establish a full-blown military occupation but to vastly expand its neoliberal economic restructuring of the country. “It’s clear that the Shock Doctrine is alive and well in Haiti.”

Eshu’s blues: An Open Letter to President Obama on Haiti

by BAR columnist michael hureaux perez
Even when claiming to speak to the nation and world about Haiti, Barack Obama winds up talking about America – and himself. The author writes, “Mr. President…“I am always astounded to see just what a shallow and pretentious presence your elevation to the national scene has become, even at this moment of colossal tragedy.”

Protecting Haiti's Interest

by John Maxwell
The “Big Three” tormenters of Haiti – the U.S., France and Canada – now posing as the quake-struck nation's benefactors, ponder how to rebuild Haiti without Haitian input or permission. “France, the United States and Canada owe the Haitians billions in damages. It is not for them to tell the Haitians what to spend it on.”
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