Blogs

Melissa Harris-Perry Buries The Lead Story on National Wave of Public School Closings

By BAR managing editor Bruce A. Dixon

When print or broadcast news outlets grab a compelling story, only to distract attention away from what the public needs to know, that's called “burying the lead.” That's what Melissa Harris-Perry did in her Jan. 26 segment on whether the nationwide wave of public school closings were “racist” or not.

Freedom Rider: Job Discrimination Lives On

by BAR editor and senior columnist Margaret Kimberley

For the masses of Black people, progress against job discrimination ground to halt decades ago. Even at the supervisory level, apartheid is the order of the day. “Black men and women are rarely hired to supervise white people. Black men supervise black men, black women supervise black women, and white men are in positions to manage everyone else.”

Django Unchained, Or, “Killing Whitey While Protecting White Power”: A Review

by Omali Yeshitela

At last: a revolutionary African analysis of Django, a movie that “does not have the ability to criticize the institution of slavery.” Jamie Foxx’s character “does not enlist his captive brothers and sisters in the enterprise of ending slavery or their own enslavement.” And, he is disconnected, choosing only “to free his wife and to exact revenge for wrongs done to her.”

Zero Dark Mali

by Pepe Escobar

The imperialial juggernaut is once again on a roll in North Africa, with France in the lead. Secular-run Algeria had “better get its US$50 billion in reserves out of Western banks as soon as possible.” But overwhelming arms do not guarantee victory. “The French are on their way to meet the American fate in both Iraq and Afghanistan.”

Africa: The New Focus of Western Domination

by A. Akbar Muhammad

Western actions in Mali indicates a new phase of imperialism, domination and plundering.” France has taken the point position in the armed intervention. However, “because of what African raw material wealth means to their futures, Britain and America couldn’t be left out.”

Mutulu’s Call: Securing the Release of Our Captured Fighters

by Kwasi Anokye

How does a fractured movement fight for release of activists facing false charges, while simultaneously defending the rights of other imprisoned freedom fighters to resist oppression by any means necessary? “Standard leftist language would have us defend our freedom fighters merely as unjustly treated individuals, not as righteous insurgents.” But what about our inherent right to self-determination?

Political Prisoners, Mass Incarceration and What's Possible for Social Movements

by Sundiata Acoli

What can social justice movements do to resist and, ultimately, topple a state that is built on mass incarceration? The author, a political prisoner, says “at this moment it seems very possible for social movements to succeed in reducing prison populations. But any reductions under the present policy would only postpone the next incarceration binge to some more cost-efficient time.”

The White House Un-Reality Show

 

by BAR executive editor Glen Ford

Despite the fact that “it was Barack Obama who began the current austerity offensive in the weeks before delivering his first inaugural address,” the president was allowed to pose as a champion of the social safety net. Having redefined war, he once again claims to be a peacemaker. By cheering the inaugural speech, progressives are only encouraging Obama’s gaming and mendacity.”

Freedom Rider: The State Killing of Aaron Swartz

 

by BAR editor and senior columnist Margaret Kimberley

A brilliant young practitioner of human interconnectedness, Aaron Swartz “played a key role in defeating the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) which used the phony threat of online piracy to make the internet less open.” He was hounded to death by venal prosecutors of “the worst judicial system on the face of the earth.”

Connecting the Dots to a Frightening Future

by Dr. Wilmer J. Leon III

Austerity, perpetually high unemployment and other aspects of the New Domestic Order are creating a new “precariat” – a class condemned to permanent precariousness and insecurity.

Calculating Reparations: $1.5 Million for Each Slave Descendant in the U.S

 

by Denis Rancourt

For some descendants of persons held in U.S. chattel bondage, no monetary sum can compensate for the enslavement of their ancestors. However, for those looking for a number, there are various ways to calculate the value of involuntary servitude. Here’s one of them.

Mali Invasion Shows That “Adieu” Does Not Always Mean

 

by Mark P. Fancher

Whether rightists or “socialists,” all French governments believe in their inalienable right to dominate Africa. French troops are on the move in Mali and the Central African Republic, and not long ago overthrew the regime in Ivory Coast. If the colonial era has passed, somebody ought to tell Paris – and French-speaking Africans – the news.

The Descent: From Dr. King to Barack Obama

 

by Ajamu Baraka

Two Nobel prizes, two different eras, awarded to Black men of near-polar opposite politics. The clash between the historically progressive African American worldview and allegiance to the corporate militarist in the White House puts great strains on the Black polity. “As African Americans, we are experiencing our most profound existential crisis since our collective experience of being enslaved.”

MLK Injustice Index 2013: Racism, Materialism and Militarism in the US

 

by Bill Quigley

The three great evils cited by Dr. Martin Luther King have proliferated since his passing. Here’s an index of their influence, today.

The American Revolution from an Anti-Racist Viewpoint

 

by Haider A. Khan

Although far more Blacks fought on the British side in the U.S. War of Independence, those Africans that sided with George Washington turned out to be his best soldiers. The white settlers won, but Blacks lost. “If the American Revolution had liberated slaves not only in the North but also in the South, its model might have inspired social revolution.”

Don’t You Dare Conflate MLK and Obama

 

by BAR executive editor Glen Ford

If Dr. King were alive today, there might be a Black president, but he or she would certainly not get MLK’s support if he behaved like Barack Obama. Dr. King would oppose Obama’s wars, “make Wall Street scream, and attempt to render the nation ungovernable under the dictatorship of the Lords of Capital.”

Freedom Rider: Obama Moves on Iran

by BAR editor and senior columnist Margaret Kimberley

No allegation against Iran is too wild for the U.S. corporate media megaphone. The fact that Iran’s modest arms industry makes a small proportion of the bullets floating around Africa is made to seem the equivalent of a mushroom cloud. “While the U.S. spins its AFRICOM web and plans to send troops to 35 different countries, Iran alone is accused of bringing violence to the continent.”

Django Unchained: Don’t Miss What’s Truly Important Because of the Smoke and Mirrors

 

by C. Liegh McInnis

It was never correct to group much of African American-themed cinema under the heading “Blacksploitation.” The latest blockbuster of the genre deserves to be examined as serious social commentary. “Django Unchained exposes well the complex classes of slaves, the complex relationships between slaves, and the complex relationships between slaves and whites within the ‘peculiar institution.’”

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