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Eritrea

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    Eritrea: Doing Mining Right in Africa

    by Thomas C. Mountain

    Tiny Eritrea, which won a long war of independence from Ethiopia, has incurred Washington’s wrath because of its refusal to become trapped in western military and financial entanglements. Among the slanders is that Eritrea uses slave labor in its gold mines. The author asked people who work in the mines “if they ever considered themselves to be ‘slave labor’? They were rather insulted.”

    Ethiopia: Desalegn’s distraction?

    by FikreJesus Amahazion

    Ethiopian strongman Hailemariam Desalegn, like the late dictator (and darling of Washington) Meles Zenawi before him, threatens to overthrow the government of neighboring Eritrea. The regime in Addis Ababa has plenty of reasons to divert attention from its internal problems: ethnic rebellions, grinding poverty, scandalous land giveaways and forced relocations, and upcoming elections that few will regard as fair and legitimate.

    The African Union: Still Subservient After All These Years

    A Black Agenda Radio commentary by executive editor Glen Ford

    The African Union made a show of rejecting the International Criminal Court’s “race hunting” methods, but the facts of dependence on the imperial powers remain. “Virtually all the armies of Africa, except for Eritrea, Zimbabwe and Sudan, have become integrated into either U.S. or French military structures.”

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    21 Years and Counting: Eritrea’s Independent Path Towards Sustainable Development, Peace & Cooperation

     

    by Elias Amare

    Eritrea, a small African nation on the Red Sea that won its independence from Ethiopia in a 30-year war and was once praised by the West for its policies of self-reliance, is now demonized as a “rogue state.” Washington showers Ethiopia with billions in economic and military aid. “The US and its European allies must reverse their misguided policies of propping up tyrannical client regimes in the Horn of Africa and play a constructive role of peace by de-escalating their militarization of the region.”

    Where Will the U.S. Strike Next in Africa?

     

    A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

    The U.S. is stalking Africa like an imperial predator. Eritrea is on the short list of who’s going to be attacked next. Eritrea, says the U.S., creates instability. However, “it is not little Eritrea that is destabilizing the Horn of Africa, but the United States, which has made the region a front line in its so-called War on Terror.”

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    Eritrea: An Island of Food in Africa’s Horn of Hunger

    by Thomas C. Mountain

    Drought kills, but spiraling food prices can also bring hunger. While Ethiopia exported food for cash as drought and famine loomed, Eritrea is like “an island the size of Britain where affordable bread is there for all and slowly but steadily, life gets better.” Meanwhile, in Ethiopia, “basics like wheat, barley, sorghum and chick peas become so expensive malnutrition rates for children spike.” Naturally, Ethiopia is a U.S. client state, while Eritrea is on the American hit list.

    Who Demonizes Eritrea and Why?

    by Mohamed Hassan
    Eritrea is among the targets of the U.S. imperial offensive in the Horn of Africa. Under American pressure, the United Nations Security Council imposed sanctions on Red Sea coast nation, claiming Eritrea aids fighters resisting the U.S.-backed puppet regime in Somalia. Washington’s goal is “to control the Middle East and access by Africa to the Indian Ocean.”
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